Aboriginal Healing Articles
 

Steve Wilson

Steve Wilson (1965-) traces his heritage through his grandmother back to the Muruwari tribe (Muruwari (Moo-roo-warri) - meaning 'to fall (warri) with a fighting club (murru) in one's hand')
The Muruwari people were an important group who occupied an area of Australia from about Cunnamulla in south-west Queensland, southward to the northern bank of the Barwon River near Brewarrina, New South Wales.

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Mellifluent Meditation

Way back when I was a little boy and hair grew on my (now bald) head, there was a lyrebird that lived in the thick forests just to the east of our tiny hamlet and this bird mimicked the sound of the sawmill. It was difficult—even impossible—to be sure if the sound was a lyrebird or the huge saw eating the massive eucalyptus trees that covered our mountains; that is, unless the sound happened on a Sunday. If it was Sunday, then we knew it was the lyrebird—simply because the mill didn’t operate on Sunday. The lyrebird—Boolidt’boolidtba—is my totem.


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Aboriginal Medicine Men and Women

The term Aboriginal Medicine Men has something of the flavour of witch doctor about it; yet it is, as Professor A.P. Elkin (anthropologist) put it, a position of elevated education and social standing: Aboriginal Men of High Degree. Medicine is not the sole province of men in Aboriginal society; though it must be said that there was a gender delineation as will be explained further in this brief article. There is one more important explanation and qualification I would wish to express before continuing with this article: it is all too easy for Australians to treat Aboriginal culture as a pre-historic artifact—or at best something dated to the time of early white contact.

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Eh, Kev, Listen to This...

Before the coming of White fella to this country, Aboriginal people did pretty well in the health department—particularly on the coastal fringes of this continent and its islands. Just about all reports mentioning the Aboriginal people in the very early period of contact (with the exception of Dampier’s) suggested a robust and healthy people with almost no reports of physiological problems or deformations that might suggest a wretched people struggling to exist. In fact, archaeological evidence suggests a healthy people with long life and a phenomenally wide and healthy diet. At that time of initial contact by white people, Europeans were dying in their millions of epidemic diseases and life expectancy of Europeans was not too flash.

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Kim Healey

Kim Healey

Kim Healey is a descendant of the Djunbun clan (northern NSW, Australia) which was her grandfather Tobi Bancroft’s country ( Fresh Water people). She lived there for a few years care taking the land, and living with solar power and tank water which was very special to her. As hard as it was at times, especially during Winter with a new born baby and limited resources, Kim made do, and bought her children up connected to their ancestor’s country, and learning to work for basic needs such as a hot bath. Her grandmother Elsie Bancroft was of the Dhungutti people who were from Nambucca Heads (northern NSW, Australia) which is a coastal area (Saltwater people).

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Karla Dickens

Karla Dickens, Wiradjuri painter, was born in Sydney in 1967. Karla began creating art at high school in Life Drawing classes where the female form was her main subject matter. She began her formal training as an artist when she enrolled at the National Art School in Darlinghurst, Sydney in 1991 where she obtained a Fine Arts Diploma in 1993 and a Bachelor in Fine Arts in 2000.

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