Recipes
   

Brioche-Quinoa Cake

Most cakes consist of flour and sugar as the main ingredients, which raises blood sugar levels and makes you hungry later. This cake is packed full of Quinoa, which is high in protein making it low GI, gluten free and also good on iron and fibre. This makes this recipe guilt-free and suitable for diabetics, coeliacs and those who are weight conscious. The taste is surprising – not sweet like most cakes, but satisfying and flavoursome.

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Gluten Free Pizza Base

Who doesn’t like a slice of pizza occasionally ? Traditionally pizzas bases have been made from wheat flour which is what can cause serious digestive upsets for Coeliacs, and so for many people, going out for a pizza with friends has meant sitting at the table eating a bowl of salad or nothing at all. Fortunately these days, due to popular demand many Pizza Parlours provide an interesting array of gluten-free pizzas...

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Sprouted Buckwheat Pizza Base

The Pizza originated in the Mediterranean area in around the 16th century. Bread was one of the oldest prepared foods dating back to this age. The Ancient Greeks, for example, had a flat bread called "plakuntos" which was flavoured with various toppings such as herbs, onion and garlic. Greeks also made a flatbread called "Pita". Records of people adding other ingredients to bread to make it more flavoursome can be found throughout ancient history.


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Morrocan Barley Rice Risotto

From the best malt whiskey to nutritious baby food, Barley has served the needs of humans and animals for thousands of years. Before Stone Age man knew how to grind grain in to flour, he ate Barley grains along with his food.

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Barley Stuffed Eggplant

In the later ancient cultures Barley grains were ground and used for making breads.  Barley was first used as a crop in North Africa and Middle Eastern countries, where desert nomads carried and traded their grains to fellow travelers. Thanks to them we can enjoy this amazing versatile grain today.

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Barley Carob Cookies

Barley was used in China before wheat, in fact in some parts of northern China Barley was often eaten instead of rice. The Emperor Shen Nung placed a high value on Barley - so much so that he deemed it one of the five sacred cultivated plants of China.

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Besan Omelette

Besan (chickpea) is believed to have originated in Turkey, and over time found its way to the Mediterranean, Western Asia and India. It is now grown in many countries of the world including the USA, the Americas and Australia. By the Bronze Age, Chickpeas were known to be grown in Italy and Greece.

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Besan Chic Pea Crepes with Roasted Vegtables

In classical Greece, besan was known as ‘erebinthos’, and eaten both as a staple, a dessert, and consumed raw when young. The Romans grew the varieties known as venus, ram and punic. They were cooked in a broth and roasted as a snack. Carbonised chickpeas have been found at the Roman legionary fort at Neuss in Germany, along with rice.

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Besan Dumplings in Coconut Curry

Besan or Chickpea flour is a great substitute for eggs as it’s high protein content works as a binder - just like eggs. It can be used to make omelettes, thicken soups, make crepes, pizzas, a tofu-like product, crunchy snacks and much more.

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